Gluttony (Part 2): Am I a Glutton?

Knowing what gluttony is and identifying whether you are a glutton are two completely different things. How do you know when you have crossed the line into gluttony? Do some self examination and see where you are at.

Read More »

Gluttony (Part 3): How to Overcome

Overcoming gluttony is hard. Many do not know how to start. The solution, although hard to implement, is actually easy. Step by step, slowly improving, you can do it!

Read More »

Treatment of Food Allergy

The treatment of food allergies can seem complex, just like the diagnosis. Some allergies need to be treated immediately as they can prove fatal if neglected for long. Food allergies can be treated from different dimensions at the same time, such as eliminating the problem causing food or allergens from the diet completely, strengthening the patient nutritionally and modifying the patient’s immune response.

Read More »

Different Types of Food Allergies

A food allergy is an adverse effect that occurs when the human body believes that a particular type of food is harmful. It is an immune reaction to food antigens. There are three major types of food allergies. It is important to differentiate between these as they are all different types of immune reactions to food antibodies.

Read More »

Assessment for Eating Disorders

Initial Intake Assessment – Presenting Problem: Why are you seeking help at this time? What are you struggling with the most?

Read More »

For the Loved Ones of Those Suffering With an Eating Disorder

One of the most difficult tasks any of us face is watching the struggle and suffering of those we love. It is especially difficult and heart wrenching to watch a loved one suffer with an eating disorder. What makes it so difficult are its far reaching effects: physical, mental, emotional, social, and spiritual damage, confusion, and chaos. With anorexia that chaos and confusion can be hidden under rigid perfectionism and an illusion of control. With bulimia and binge eating disorder, the confusion and chaos may be more obvious to us on the outside.

Read More »

Therapy Insights in Treating Binge Eating Disorder

One patient dealing with abuse and trauma issues in therapy used binge eating to relieve the symptoms of depression and anxiety. As work in therapy continued, it was discovered that this patient began emotionally eating at the same time the abuse occurred. As a child certain foods were monitored by her parents, such as cereals with sugar. She was only allowed such cereals one day out of the week. Therefore, the intake of cereal on days other than the one already designated and/or if she ate more than a certain amount was monitored. As this patient got older, she learned that much focus and attention was given to what kind of food she ate or did not eat.

Read More »

Love Yourself – You Are Worth It

The key element of eating naturally is to be “mindful” of what your body wants and needs. To do this we simply need to listen to it. Often however we have lost our ability to listen as we stumble along by habit, which becomes very difficult to change. Once we decide however that we are worth it, then we can listen because we want to make positive changes.

Read More »

How To Stop Eating Sugar

Sugar is one of the most addictive foods we can put into our bodies. Sugar is the ingredient that I believe kept my animal brain caught in a repetitive cycle of binge eating. Sugar addiction goes beyond candy and cakes… it’s the simple, refined carbohydrates that cause an insulin spike in our blood sugar. This also triggers parts of our brains which can become addicted, just like someone becomes addicted to heroin. I’ve gotten many emails from readers asking questions about how to deal with their addiction to sugar, which is usually the triggering food for a binge. There are common themes in the questions, and I can relate to many people who are disgusted with their failed attempts to break the habit.

Read More »

What a Runner in 1954 Can Teach You About Binge Eating

In 1954, one man challenged beliefs around the world when he broke the record for running a mile in under 4 minutes. Roger Bannister, a junior doctor, believed he could beat the record that experts swore was humanly impossible… and he did. While that’s definitely impressive, what’s more remarkable is that in only 46 days, someone else beat Roger’s record. What had been accepted for hundreds of years now had been surpassed twice in a month and a half. Once people saw an example of what was possible, beliefs shifted. When their beliefs shifted, more people were able to do what they’d once dismissed. What’s this have to do with your relationship with food? What you believe shapes what you achieve.

Read More »